Russian handlers of anti-vaxx protests continue to set up their puppets

The latest Kyiv rally of anti-vaxxers outside the Verkhovna Rada on November 24 personally to me is strongly associated with the Kunstkammer characters. A mixture of surrealistic images filled with surrealistic content, relayed through verbiage, weird posters, and some ephemeral demands.

But, the most discussed issue around the latest meetup of anti-vaxxers was that they used for their posters the images of QR codes, leading straight to the website of Russia’s ruling party, Yedinaya Rossiya (United Russia).

On the one hand, this fact gave grounds to suggest direct involvement in Russia’s anti-vaccination movement, and on the other hand, a version arose that the symbol of the crossed out QR code of Putin’s party kind of traveled across the border from Russia, where it was initially used by local anti-vaxxers in their rallies against the party in power.

Does it mean that Ukrainian anti-vaxxers simply used the symbol of their Russian comrades who express discontent with the ruling party’s actions, that they’re innocent and blameless? Spoiler: it doesn’t.

Firstly, the connection between the leaders of anti-vaccination movements in Ukraine and Russia is already the main line in the ongoing criminal inquiry. The anti-vaxxers’ leaders in Ukraine were financed and supervised from Russia, which was also emphasized by the SBU security agency.

Secondly, it’s not only in Ukraine where the anti-vaccination movement is sponsored and handled by Russia — it’s throughout the world.

In the same way, Russia finances and oversees neo-Nazi groups across the EU and even prepares them in Russian training camps for urban combat operations. There’s plenty of documented evidence in open sources, and I personally penned some pieces on the issue.

In the same way, Russia finances and oversees populist and right-wing radical parties around the world, about which there lots of exposing articles have been published, while a number of governments are now probing these facts.

In the same way, Russia finances and oversees unscrupulous media outlets, opinion leaders, pseudo-experts, and NGOs around the globe that circulate its propaganda narratives.

In the same way … In fact, it would be easier to just read in more detail my monograph “Strategic Communications in Conditions of Hybrid Warfare: Volunteers and Researchers’ Perspectives” where I devoted an entire section to the issues of Russian agents of influence infiltrating the EU through a wide range of areas of public life, including politics and media.

So the movement of anti-vaxxers, just like ANTIFA or “Yellow Vests,” is a destabilizing factor. And anything that is able to destabilize other countries is a matter of interest to Russia. Today, just like ANTIFA and “Yellow Vests” in certain periods of time, anti-vaxxers have become an element of Moscow’s pressure on the EU member states.

But the question arises, how under such conditions can any anti-vaxxers operate in Russia? Why does Moscow need this kind of destabilization within their own country? Here’s why.

Russia is now the world’s leader in Covid-related deaths. Moreover, in Russia, 44% of the population have taken at least one shot of the vaccine, while 37% have been fully vaccinated. And despite such a rather high inoculation rate, Russia remains the world’s leader in the number of corona fatalities. This is primarily due to the fact that the Russian Sputnik-V vaccine has proved inefficient against the novel coronavirus.

At the same time, for the second year already, Russia has been claiming to have created the most effective drug against COVID-19, refuses to allow Western vaccines into the country. So how would they justify the low efficiency of the Russian vaccine, which is proved by catastrophic morbidity and mortality? Blame the anti-vaccination movement for discouraging people from getting their shts.

In Russia, the anti-vaxxers’ movement is a necessity. The authorities need it in order to justify the low efficiency of Sputnik-V — only to claim that it’s not their flawed vaccine that is to blame, but the anti-vaxxers.

In addition, the existence of such movement in Russia, a country where any criticism of the government, even on social media, may entail an actual prison term, is simply an unimaginable thing. Still, it’s out there, and its members even sometimes resort to storm local government buildings, such as the Legislative Assembly in Chelyabinsk — with total impunity…

So it seems to be nothing but a cover-up, approved by Russian authorities, designed to show the world that such malign movements exist in Russia, too!

And now let’s get to another important thing.

In the countries of the former Soviet Union, where Russia is interested in destabilizing the socio-social and political situation, the anti-vaccination movement is used in a relatively similar way, but with slightly different purposes.

While in Russia they become the main culprits in disrupting mass vaccination with the “best drug in the world”, in Moldova and Ukraine, for example, they are used to disrupt vaccination with the subsequent destabilization and undermining public confidence in the government.

The handlers behind the scheme are the same. The funding is the same. Roughly speaking, the headquarters is the same. Also, some paraphernalia designed for the rallies are the same, including posters and logos, as well as some slogans. The goals, however, are different.

Therefore, there is nothing surprising in the fact that a few weeks ago anti-vaxxers in Kyiv took to the streets carrying the same posters that had been seen just a few months ago in Moldova’s Chisinau. Yesterday, they already posed with the posters earlier carried by their Russian counterparts.

The Russian masterminds’ creative department even makes no effort to design specific posters for foreign territories. These handlers offer their minions the same design, which, of course, exposes them as the ones standing behind all these rallies spreading nonsense which is then echoed by a mob of conspiracy theorists horrified by 5G towers and computer chips.

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