Nord Stream 2: Clear and expected threats of hybrid pipeline

The events that are now starting to rage around the Nord Stream 2 pipeline take the most unpleasant turn – first of all, for the European Union itself, which Germany is now trying to split with all its vigor and despair. But the question now is not even in the treacherous initiatives of the Bundestag with a greenlight from Angela Merkel.
Last week in my piece titled “Safe” route of Nord Stream 2, I raised the historical issues of the pipeline route agreed by Denmark, which in fact turned out to be the most dangerous one in the Baltic Sea. The expert community, which had never paid attention to this, suddenly realized the threat. Indeed, the seabed in the area of  Bornholm Island was literally strewn with chemical munitions that were uncontrollably dumped in the area by the Soviet Union in the period from 1946 to 1948.

Will this become another obstacle for Nord Stream 2? Time will tell. But I’d like to mention one more pitfall, which almost no one notes in the context of the discussion of the Nord Stream 2 route.
The thing is that almost simultaneously with the permit for Nord Stream 2, another one was issued – for the Baltic Pipe gas pipeline set to connect Norway and Poland, designed to provide Poles with gas as part of the program of their energy independence from Russia.
And now, a very relevant question arises. One way or another, both pipelines intersect at some specific point. Moreover, the point of their intersection may even become precisely the hazardous region full of dumped chemical munitions, where any emergency could lead to an environmental disaster of a pan-European scale.
Of course, I’m confident in Norway’s expertise and control of technological and technical processes by, but as for the Russians, doubts amount.
Moreover, Russia has been laying its pipe much faster than Norway and is now actually reaching the final stretch. So it can become a serious obstacle to the laying of the Baltic Pipe, because now Norway, one way or another, will have to coordinate the construction with Moscow. And as I mentioned above, Baltic Pipe plays an important role in ensuring Poland’s energy independence from Russia, and therefore, who can say with 100% certainty that the negotiations will be successful? Here I’m also more than confident that Russia will create insurmountable obstacles for the Baltic Pipe and I don’t even exclude a certain kind of sabotage in the Norwegian construction.
Poland also is well aware of this, so it is not surprising that Warsaw is seriously concerned about such prospects. In particular, Polish MEP Jacek Sariusz-Wolski said: “Before us are all possible measures to slow [it] down. The Danish decision can be appealed within a month,” noting that the threat of sanctions on the part of the U.S. Congress will play an important role in delaying the Russian project.
But regularly mentioning Nord Stream 2, I’m even lost in voicing the number of threats that it carries to Europe. Non-volatility? Economic and political? Ecological? EU integrity threat?
It seems that Nord Stream 2, no matter the success the pipeline could see (economists’ estimates say it won’t) is already an extremely successful hybrid project aimed at sowing chaos and splitting the EU.
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